TIOT- Why Recording Dates is Important in Journaling

Hello, friends! I’m dropping in to share with you what I’ve created over the last little while. It’s been so refreshing to do my own creating for a change, but I have to say I feel a bit out of the loop! Do you ever feel that way in relation to your crafting?

I’m on a roll with Fresh Air. I made a point of using the complements, stamps and journaling cards where I could. Of course, I used the papers too. I just love the neutral palette. It really speaks to me. I find it calming and welcoming. My home is painted in the same hues. (At one time in my life, I dressed in mostly earthen tones, too). Yes, I love neutrals!

I also turned to Central Park, and used it to highlight a significant milestone in my husbands’ life:

But, because I can’t get enough of Fresh Air, I snuck some of its papers into this spread, too! You’ll find a number of collections here. I used two paper collections, and two different complements collections, too. Can you spot them and name them? Here’s your homework for the day! 😉 (Just kidding, I don’t actually expect you to research what they are). Here’s a hint: Fresh Air (duh), Central Park, Documented and Stargazer. Now can you pick them out?

Do you share your pictures on Facebook? Are you meticulous about recording the dates of events as you scrapbook them? And, by extension, do you jot down your thoughts for the purpose of journaling on your layout at a later time?

If you’ve followed my blog for a while, you’ll know that I like recording the dates in my layouts. It’s a little piece of information that’s quite important. It’s a detail that I want included and not forgotten. (Especially if it’s related to a special event, like Easter, and the only photo you have from it is a home made cake). 😐

I share my pictures to Facebook. Naturally, right? Lots of people are prone to add pictures to their Facebook. As a result, it becomes an unintentional photo album- or, dare I say it- a scrapbook album. It’s a good practice to get into, because if you run into any problems with your pc (for any reason), or you lose your stick it notes or journal with notes jotted in it, you’ll have a “back up” of sorts to help you out of that bind. Dates are always recorded when pictures are posted to Facebook. When you have a printed photo and you can’t figure out why it’s in your ‘to scrapbook’ pile, you’ll be able to deduce- through Facebook and google- that April 17, 2016 was Easter. So, that mysterious cake with blue frosting and duckie sprinkles was actually for Easter. (On a side note, stay tuned for a layout with that very picture in it).

Recording dates, especially for the purpose of journaling, is super important. It helps keep you organized. Holidays, such as Easter, always fall at different times of the month. Sometimes it’s in March, other times, it’s in April. You’ll want to stay on top of those dates so that the details remain accurate. If you’re not a chronological scrapbooker, keeping dates becomes even more important. Knowing what day your BFF’s wedding fell on is something you probably shouldn’t forget!

It helps you keep your events and other (‘smaller’) daily memories in order. Say someone asked you to confirm the date of something- maybe a particular vacation you took together. Would you be able to recall it off the top of your head? What if it happened 8 years ago, or 20? Now can you? My sister texted me the other day, and asked me when we took a particular family vacation. There was a bet going between her and my parents: mom believes I was in high school when we went on this particular trip, and dad and K believe I was already in college. Umm. I can’t tell you when it was. That makes my heart so sad. Dates are incredibly important! Our memories are even more so! Treat them with the utmost care, so they don’t die along with us. I didn’t scrapbook back then, but it highlights the importance of recording dates along with your thoughts and emotions of events that occur throughout your life.

If I did scrapbook then, I would’ve been able to consult the album it was in and provide the exact dates. All I know (that I can remember), is that I had written a letter to one of my high school friends while I was on that trip. I believe I was in high school, but that may not be accurate. Memories lie. (Read this blog post to understand what I mean).

Also, it makes the labor of putting your heart into each page of your album so much easier. It completes the package. Rather than wracking my brains trying to remember details that have completely escaped me, ultimately giving up in defeat and only sharing half to little supporting information, I can relax in the knowledge that the missing piece of the puzzle is tucked safely away in a place I can access easily at any time I need to. Personally, I feel that when some or all the pieces of a memory are missing, my layout is incomplete. I’ve told only half the story, my layout hasn’t reached its full potential. The easiest way to prevent that is to jot your thoughts down, record the date, and share as many supporting details as you can. No one wants an incomplete grade on their homework assignment. Why would you want your layout labelled the same way?

That’s my little tangent for today. I hope you find this tip useful! My scrapbooking became much easier, as a result, and I hope you find the same! Apply it, try it out and see how it feels. It’s never too late to try something new. I suppose it’s better late than not at all! It’ll save you heartache, writing only part of your story, and it’ll help you stay on track and organized!

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